Video 21 Aug 6,978 notes

jasoniaistheway:

Since Everybody is doing it… Here are my 6 favorite selfies🌻🌻🌻

Quote 7 Aug 5,229 notes
Fashion is one of the very few forms of expression in which women have more freedom than men. And I don’t think it’s an accident that it’s typically seen as shallow, trivial, and vain. It is the height of irony that women are valued for our looks, encouraged to make ourselves beautiful and ornamental… and are then derided as shallow and vain for doing so. And it’s a subtle but definite form of sexism to take one of the few forms of expression where women have more freedom, and treat it as a form of expression that’s inherently superficial and trivial. Like it or not, fashion and style are primarily a women’s art form. And I think it gets treated as trivial because women get treated as trivial. What’s more, there’s an interestingly sexist assumption that often gets made about female fashion — namely, that it’s primarily intended to get male attention and male approval.
Photo 3 Aug 18,396 notes

(Source: thesomebodytoknow)

via Daily Murf.
Video 3 Aug 13,222 notes

fuckyeahsexeducation:

themidwifeisin:

Photos of real pregnant and postpartum women.  

So beautiful! So glad these are in Cosmo!


for breastfeeding awareness week!

Quote 31 Jul 1,983 notes
I love my naked body like few other things in the world. It is mine, to do with as I please. It carries me through this life and has allowed me many things I didn’t expect. It changes and morphs into new versions of itself and I love all of them. I decorate her with tattoos and take her out dancing. I could never be ashamed or embarrassed of her…I’m not exposed or exploited when I am naked. That would be applying someone else’s expectations onto my body…When I am naked I am not brave or vulnerable or there for you. When I am naked, I am divine.
Quote 30 Jul 325,318 notes

How to talk to your daughter about her body, step one: don’t talk to your daughter about her body, except to teach her how it works.

Don’t say anything if she’s lost weight. Don’t say anything if she’s gained weight.

If you think your daughter’s body looks amazing, don’t say that. Here are some things you can say instead:

“You look so healthy!” is a great one.

Or how about, “you’re looking so strong.”

“I can see how happy you are – you’re glowing.”

Better yet, compliment her on something that has nothing to do with her body.

Don’t comment on other women’s bodies either. Nope. Not a single comment, not a nice one or a mean one.

Teach her about kindness towards others, but also kindness towards yourself.

Don’t you dare talk about how much you hate your body in front of your daughter, or talk about your new diet. In fact, don’t go on a diet in front of your daughter. Buy healthy food. Cook healthy meals. But don’t say “I’m not eating carbs right now.” Your daughter should never think that carbs are evil, because shame over what you eat only leads to shame about yourself.

Encourage your daughter to run because it makes her feel less stressed. Encourage your daughter to climb mountains because there is nowhere better to explore your spirituality than the peak of the universe. Encourage your daughter to surf, or rock climb, or mountain bike because it scares her and that’s a good thing sometimes.

Help your daughter love soccer or rowing or hockey because sports make her a better leader and a more confident woman. Explain that no matter how old you get, you’ll never stop needing good teamwork. Never make her play a sport she isn’t absolutely in love with.

Prove to your daughter that women don’t need men to move their furniture.

Teach your daughter how to cook kale.

Teach your daughter how to bake chocolate cake made with six sticks of butter.

Pass on your own mom’s recipe for Christmas morning coffee cake. Pass on your love of being outside.

Maybe you and your daughter both have thick thighs or wide ribcages. It’s easy to hate these non-size zero body parts. Don’t. Tell your daughter that with her legs she can run a marathon if she wants to, and her ribcage is nothing but a carrying case for strong lungs. She can scream and she can sing and she can lift up the world, if she wants.

Remind your daughter that the best thing she can do with her body is to use it to mobilize her beautiful soul.

— 

skoppelkam on Wordpress (via moxie-bird)

The EXACT opposite of the way my mother treats me about my body.

(via annie-finds)

my major face holes are leaking

(via ahhmmmburr)

Quote 27 Jul 859 notes
As a fat woman, I’m no longer content for women who are not fat to define themselves as such to lend their defensiveness and unhappiness with their bodies credibility. As a feminist, I’m no longer content to watch women of color treated as props to further an appropriation of beauty standards that white women boast about and black women are oppressed by. If the core of your message devalues other women based on their physical appearance, you’re not promoting an ideal that helps women in the way you believe it does.
Photo 26 Jul 380 notes chubby-bunnies:

♡ The fitting room chronicles continue with me loving every ounce of my body ♡
size 16/18 US
come say hi, and continue the support

chubby-bunnies:

♡ The fitting room chronicles continue with me loving every ounce of my body 

size 16/18 US

come say hi, and continue the support

Photo 25 Jul 74,316 notes pervocracy:

pastel-cutie:

YESSSS

Cosmo fashion advice is often centered on “if you have long legs, wear things to make them look shorter! if you have short legs, wear things to make them look longer!”, as if the ideal look for every woman is “oh wow, look at her, she’s so statistically average.”

pervocracy:

pastel-cutie:

YESSSS

Cosmo fashion advice is often centered on “if you have long legs, wear things to make them look shorter! if you have short legs, wear things to make them look longer!”, as if the ideal look for every woman is “oh wow, look at her, she’s so statistically average.”

(Source: fightingwaves)

Photo 24 Jul 66,136 notes train-eat-sleep:

This is SO important for people to realize…so often i have had people ask me why they are the same weight as myself or someone else, but they wear a different size, or complain that they look so very different. Body composition people, and skeletal structure. We are each unique. Don’t ever compare yourself to someone else in a negative way. 

train-eat-sleep:

This is SO important for people to realize…so often i have had people ask me why they are the same weight as myself or someone else, but they wear a different size, or complain that they look so very different. Body composition people, and skeletal structure. We are each unique. Don’t ever compare yourself to someone else in a negative way. 

(Source: artist-refs)


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